Snatch & Clean the Same

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Snatch & Clean the Same

In my opinion, the Snatch and Clean should be treated the same, with of course a different grip. The mechanics and geometry used to raise the bar (regardless of height) should be similar during both lifts.

During the Snatch, athletes believe the bar should be raised as far as possible overhead before attempting to 'get under the bar' - elite athletes can actually elevate the bar to the same height as their Clean.
The truth is, pulling the bar far enough to drop under it will suffice. This concept makes the movement simpler and helps coaches develop beginner and intermediate lifters.

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Smooth Dip & Drive

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Smooth Dip & Drive

Athletes who lock their knees prior to the Jerk may suffer from a stuttered ‘dip & drive’, primarily caused by a lag in quad tension. A lag in quad tension can also lead to contact issues with the bar, causing it to bounce on the shoulders during the attempt.
Coaches should cue their athletes to unlock their knees slightly. Unlocking the knees places tension on the quads making the movement smoother creating a controlled jerk. It is possible to maintain a straight upright stance while keeping the knees slightly unlocked.

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Smooth Dip & Drive

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Smooth Dip & Drive

Athletes who lock their knees prior to the Jerk may suffer from a stuttered ‘dip & drive’, primarily caused by a lag in quad tension. A lag in quad tension can also lead to contact issues with the bar, causing it to bounce on the shoulders during the attempt.
Coaches should cue their athletes to unlock their knees slightly. Unlocking the knees places tension on the quads making the movement smoother creating a controlled jerk. It is possible to maintain a straight upright stance while keeping the knees slightly unlocked.

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Which style of Jerk to commit to?

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Which style of Jerk to commit to?

Deciding which type of Jerk to commit to isn't as difficult as people might think. By definition, all Jerks (Split, Push, Power or Squat) require a dip of the hips/leg, a drive upward, and a re-dip or "catch." As such, the question that must be solved is which of the styles can the athlete get the lowest while maintaining strong shoulders. In the end, the lower the athlete can receive the barbell (during heavy loads) while remaining strong the more effective they'll be. So, figure this out and you'll easily figure out which of the 4 styles of Jerks fit your athlete.

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Shifting the Feet

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Shifting the Feet

Is it necessary to make the loud sound of the feet when we lift? No, it is not necessary. Many athletes don't move their feet at all, and they do quite well. However, I do believe in shifting the feet; I teach a relatively narrow start (jumping stance) into a wider catch (squat stance). I encourage athletes to make the loud crack of the feet to promote foot balance and stability, but NOT because it sounds cool.
In my opinion, the athletes must land flat-footed to avoid a wobbly catch. I realize that a beginner trying to make the loud sound puts the them at a risk of a large hop, instead of a low shift. An athlete jumping too high is unfavorable and there is a way to make the sound without the unecessary airtime. I have my athletes SHIFT their feet, not JUMP their feet. To correct this error, cue athletes to shift their feet as they pull themselves under, rather than shifting their feet as they extend.

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Dynamic Start

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Dynamic Start

Many of my posts are geared towards athletes (beginners/intermediates) and coaches. This post however is a bit more advanced. 

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